Rolling Stone’s 500 Greatest Songs: 350-341

350. “The Harder They Come” – Jimmy Cliff
While I enjoy listening to Reggae (though, I’ll admit, my experience with the genre mainly consists of Bob Marley’s work), I find the majority of the stuff I’ve heard to be a bit too formulaic and laid-back to be considered among the greatest music of all time. But this upbeat little number that was originally written for a movie surprised me. It’s definitely worth further listens.
Burnes’ Turns: Yes
Top 500 Consideration: Yes

baba-oriley

349. “Baba O’Riley” – The Who
I’ve stated before that I don’t really consider The Who to be on the level of fellow British Invaders like The Beatles and The Rolling Stones, but there’s no doubt that this is one of the greatest songs ever written. The opening alone is enough to send shivers down just about any spine on the planet, and the track only takes off from there before ending with an authentic Irish jig. Epic.
Burnes’ Turns: Yes
Top 500 Consideration: Yes

348. “You Keep Me Hangin on” – The Supremes
There are times when The Supremes wow me, but I find the majority of their catalog to be fairly hum-drum. This is another one of those occasions. Nothing about this is out of the ordinary, and there’s absolutely no way I would ever consider it to be on my list.
Burnes’ Turns: No
Top 500 Consideration: No

347. “Maybe I’m Amazed” – Paul McCartney
Speaking of hum-drum, this by-the-numbers ballad written by Paul McCartney as The Beatles were dissolving is far from being on the level of the Fab Four. There’s nothing wrong with it, but there are many, many more sonically invigorating ballads available.
Burnes’ Turns: No
Top 500 Consideration: No

346. “Walk This Way” – Aerosmith
Though I could be wrong, I’m fairly certain that Rolling Stone included both versions of “Walk This Way” on this list, with the Run-DMC version appearing higher up. If that’s the case, it’s a horrible waste of a spot that somebody else could’ve taken. For the record, the DMC version is superior due to Steven Tyler’s epic choral screaming and Joe Perry’s awesome extended soloing at the end. Kinda makes this recording seem worthless, though.
Burnes’ Turns: Yes
Top 500 Consideration: No

345. “Beautiful Day” – U2
Rolling Stone claims that this song “re-established U2 as the world’s biggest band” upon its release in 2000. I’m not sure about that, but it did jump to No. 1 on the charts, so there’s something. There’s no doubt that it is one of the most well-known of U2’s songs, and though it pales in comparison to their greatest triumphs, it’s still great.
Burnes’ Turns: Yes
Top 500 Consideration: Long Shot

344. “Beat it” – Michael Jackson
This is far from the best Michael Jackson song, much less the best one on Thriller (or even the fifth best on Thriller), but considering how perfect that album is, it isn’t necessarily damning. Everyone loves Eddie Van Halen’s guitar solo, but as usual, Jackson himself is the true star here.
Burnes’ Turns: Yes
Top 500 Consideration: Long Shot

343. “Wild Horses” – The Rolling Stones
Yeah, it’s repetitive, but I’ll be damned if this song still isn’t an emotional show-stealer. Even though they’re relegated to playing old Blues covers these days much like they did back in the early ’60s, when The Rolling Stones were regularly writing their own material, nobody could touch them.
Burnes’ Turns: Yes
Top 500 Consideration: Yes

342. “Sweet Jane” – The Velvet Underground
You never know what to expect from The Velvet Underground, but this sweet-yet-groovy love song is a great one. Apparently it went unfinished for a long time due to a spat between Lou Reed and the rest of the band, but thankfully we get the full thing in these modern times.
Burnes’ Turns: Yes
Top 500 Consideration: Long Shot

341. “Spirit in the Sky” – Norman Greenbaum
I don’t care for the Gospel influences, but that fuzzy guitar riff is some good stuff. If you’re into songs about Jesus (or can look past the lyrics for the grooves) then this is for you.
Burnes’ Turns: No
Top 500 Consideration: No

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