Rolling Stone’s 500 Greatest Songs: 380-371

380. “I Can’t Explain” – The Who
This catchy tune is the original single from one of the biggest bands in the history of the world: The Who. It’s interesting to me that they’ve been around for so long, but they never really got to be considered in the same league as other British invaders from that era, but it would be hard to argue that they’re on the same level as The Beatles or The Rolling Stones. This is a great song, but it’s going to be tough for it to beat out enough competition to be one of my Top 500.
Burnes’ Turns: Yes
Top 500 Consideration: Long Shot

379. “The Wind Cries Mary” – Jimi Hendrix
There’s no doubt that Jimi Hendrix was one of if not the greatest guitarist who ever lived. But as a songwriter, he often left a lot to desire. He had his moments, but “The Wind Cries Mary” was not one of them.
Burnes’ Turns: No
Top 500 Consideration: No

378. “I’m a Man” – Bo Diddley
There’s something endearing about this song (for men, anyway) especially when noting how important Bo Diddley’s influence on The Rolling Stones was. But in truth, better songs than this are probably written every week.
Burnes’ Turns: No
Top 500 Consideration: No

377. “Personal Jesus” – Depeche Mode
Somehow I’ve heard this song before. All I remember is that it involved a woman singing along in sign language. Whatever it was, I feel scarred by it, and it taints my view of this track. This is definitely better than the previous two entries, but I still won’t be putting it in my playlist, voiding any hopes of Depeche Mode appearing in my Top 500.
Burnes’ Turns: No
Top 500 Consideration: No

376. “White Room” – Cream
It’s amazing to think how different the world is now compared to what it was when a song like this could be a No. 1 hit. “White Room” is a decent enough song, but I can’t really relate to it, probably because it was born out of a bad trip in a white room. I’ve never been a big fan of drug songs in the first place, and this is just another typical track from that category.
Burnes’ Turns: No
Top 500 Consideration: No

how-deep-is-your-love

375. “How Deep is Your Love” – Bee Gees
This tender love song was the first single from the critically acclaimed Saturday Night Fever soundtrack back in September 1977, and it quickly (and deservedly) jumped to the No. 1 spot. The more I hear from The Bee Gees, the more impressed I am by not only their musicality, but their versatility. This may be my favorite thing I’ve heard from them yet.
Burnes’ Turns: Yes
Top 500 Consideration: Yes

374. “Unchained Melody” – The Righteous Brothers
Thanks to the unfettered genius of producer Phil Spector, The Righteous Brothers became the most popular cover artists in the ’60s thanks to their affinity for bringing the best out of gems from the previous decade. “Unchained Melody” is their most famous and it isn’t hard to hear why; it’s a classic for all time.
Burnes’ Turns: Yes
Top 500 Consideration: Yes

373. “Highway 61 Revisited” – Bob Dylan
Highway 61 Revisited is an album filled with badass tracks with kickass openings, and the title track has both in spades. God’s opening dialog with Abraham Lincoln has always been one of my favorite of Dylan’s historically based creations. I don’t know where Highway 61 is (apparently it starts somewhere around Dylan’s birthplace), but it must be a hell of a road.
Burnes’ Turns: Yes
Top 500 Consideration: Yes

372. “The Letter” – The Box Tops
This short-and-simple soul song was a No. 1 hit in ’67, which was no easy feat in a country overrun with Brits firing off hits from all corners of the map. This really isn’t on the level of those legends, but the vocal delivery from then-16-year-old Alex Chilton, who went on to front Big Star, is impressive.
Burnes’ Turns: No
Top 500 Consideration: No

371. “Complete Control” – The Clash
I remember playing through this straight-ahead rocker in Guitar Hero: Aerosmith (which is a bit strange, if you think about it). I like it, but it really isn’t unique enough to hear more than once every once in a while.
Burnes’ Turns: No
Top 500 Consideration: No

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