Rolling Stone’s 500 Greatest Songs: 450-441

450. “I Shot the Sheriff” – Bob Marley (1973)
Since I became an instant Bob Marley fan the first time I listened to Legend (like millions of others, probably) “I Shot the Sheriff” was one of my least favorite tunes. It doesn’t retain the easy-listening quality that makes Bob Marley the artist that he was supposed to be in my mind. But now that I’m older and wiser, I understand this isn’t a weakness; it’s the song’s strength. Marley is almost literally crying against racial injustice here, and once you understand and appreciate the subject matter, you realize it truly is a classic for all time.
Burnes’ Turns: Yes
Top 500 Consideration: Yes

449. “Come Go with Me” – The Del-Vikings (1957)
I had never heard of the Dell-Vikings before now, but with a little research it’s revealed that they’re actually a quite important group in music history; they’re the first successful interracial pop group. Not that this could ever be considered a Pop song today, but in its time, it must have been the greatest thing our lovestruck grandparents had ever heard. And you know what? It still holds up today.
Burnes’ Turns: Yes
Top 500 Consideration: Yes

448. “In da Club” – 50 Cent (2002)
Though this track appeared (in a heavily censored form) on the 2004 Grammy CD that my mom had, it wasn’t until much later that I really listened to it (Mom always skipped it along with Missy Elliot’s “Work it”). Lyrically it’s far from the best song on this list, but Dr. Dre’s production alone makes this otherwise garden-variety Rap track much better. But even with that going for it, It’s just too oversaturated for me.
Burnes’ Turns: No
Top 500 Consideration: No

447, “Pink Houses” – John Mellencamp (1983)
Though I had probably heard this song before (my grandparents love the Cougar), I wasn’t exactly what you’d call familiar. It’s easy to hear the influence that Bruce Springsteen had on Mellencamp in this song. Even if it probably wouldn’t be a standout in Springsteen’s legendary catalog, it’s still a hell of a track. But I’m not sure it’s unique enough to warrant repeated listens when Springsteen himself is available.
Burnes’ Turns: No
Top 500 Consideration: No

446. “Push it” – Salt-N-Pepa (1987)
Full disclosure: I automatically assumed that this would be one to skip when I saw it was on the list, but that synth-bass riff is a killer, and the women that make up this group, the first female MCs to crack the Top 20, are legit badasses; they boycotted the Grammys (they were nominated) when they learned the Rap award wouldn’t be televised. Trendsetters.
Burnes’ Turnes: Yes
Top 500 Consideration: Yes

445. “I Wanna Be Your Dog” – The Stooges (1969)
Unlike with the previous entry, I expected a lot from this track, which I’m almost certain I’ve heard before, but it didn’t do it for me. The three-chord riff is awesome, but Iggy’s delivery leaves a lot to be desired, and this track never really moves me. Ain’t that a Shame.
Burnes’ Turns: No
Top 500 Consideration: No

444. “Love Me Tender” – Elvis Presley (1956)
I’m not sure that this song is really as great as many think it is, but I will say that it means more to me than almost any song on this list. The night after my high school senior prom, my girlfriend at the time and I sat in my car in front of her house and made out with this track on repeat for what seemed like forever. It brings me significantly more pain when I hear it now, but the passion it invoked that night is still there; my veins run cold and my heart skips every time I hear it.
Burnes’ Turns: Yes
Top 500 Consideration: Yes

443. “Beast of Burden” – The Rolling Stones (1978)
A classic in every sense of the word. The Stones are basically unparalleled in the world of Rock and this is one of the many reasons why.
Burnes’ Turns: Yes
Top 500 Consideration: Yes

442. “Alone Again or” – Love (1968)
What a unique track. The latin-infused strumming and instrumentation create a different flavor and atmosphere to this song that I’d never heard before from a band I’d never heard of. I like it, but I’m not sure it’s something I’d put in heavy rotation.
Burnes’ Turns: No
Top 500 Consideration: No

441. “Mustang Sally” – Wilson Pickett (1966)
This funky Soul anthem is a hell of a groove, but I’ve heard too many songs like this to consider this anywhere near the Top 500. I’ve heard the phrase “Ride, Sally, ride” all my life, though, so I guess it’s influence on popular culture is undeniable. I should’ve known that phrase was rooted in something like this.
Burnes’ Turns: No
Top 500 Consideration: No

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