Rolling Stone’s 500 Greatest Songs: 470-461

The last batch of songs was the best yet featuring classics that I knew and others I didn’t with seven of the 10 worthy of consideration for my Top 500. It’ll be tough to top.

470. “Standing in the Shadows of Love” – Four Tops (1966)
This isn’t a bad song by any means, but it really doesn’t make me feel anything. I want to like The Four Tops, but for the most part, all of their songs feature hooks that just don’t grab me. This is another of those instances.
Burnes’ Turns: No
Top 500 Consideration: No

469. “Rain” – The Beatles (1966)
This is a song I had heard about for years as a Beatles fan, but I’d never actually listened to it before now since it appears only on Past Masters, a collection that I never owned. But now that their catalog is available on Spotify, I’m able to hear a plethora of their classic songs that was impossible for me previously. Though this is far from the best Beatles song, I like it a lot and offer it a place in my playlist where it can happily coexist with the sizable number of other Beatles songs that already reside there. I’ll consider it for the Top 500, too, but it’ll be tougher to break into that pack.
Burnes’ Turns: Yes
Top 500 Consideration: Yes

468. “Respect Yourself” – The Staple Singers (1971)
Brett, my grandfather (who we call Pappy) and I listened to this section of the Top 500 on the way to one of Pappy’s many doctor’s appointments. Neither Brett nor I had ever heard this track before, but Brett loved it from the first bar. I may not be as big of a fan as he is, but the groove in this Bluesy number is undeniably great. I just don’t quite consider it unique enough to warrant multiple listens.
Burnes’ Turns: No
Top 500 Consideration: No

467. “Big Pimpin'” – Jay-Z (1999)
Unlike “Respect Yourself,” Jay’s supposed “Rap classic” was not a hit with Brett or Pappy. I can understand that; if there’s anybody more overrated than Jay-Z it must be his wife. I used to hate this track, too, but I must say, it has rather grown on me over the years. But does that mean it’s one of the greatest songs ever? Absolutely not.
Burnes’ Turns: Yes
Top 500 Consideration: No

466. “Get Ur Freak on” – Missy Elliot (2001)
Missy Elliot is one of those artists you either love or hate. Pappy and Brett were in the latter, but I reside in the former. This Timbaland-produced beat is out of this world and even if it isn’t universally loved, this track is worth considering for the Top 500 in my book. Who’s getting left now, Jay?
Burnes’ Turns: Yes
Top 500 Consideration: Yes

465. Rollin’ Stone – Muddy Waters (1948)
You won’t find a track that sounds more out of place with this section of the Top 500 than Muddy Waters’ swampy trendsetter (this is where The Rolling Stones got their name). You can almost hear the grit rolling off of Waters’ guitar through his distorted amp, creating a hell of a unique sound. I like it a lot and it has a place in my playlist. But I’m not sure it’s aged well enough to be Top 500 material. After all, a lot has happened between 1948 and 2016. Interesting sidenote: years ago when Brett first heard this song he absolutely loved it, dancing around the room snapping his fingers to the track’s almost nonexistent beat. But now, he has no recollection of that evening and is not impressed with this number at all. It’s hard to find a consistent fanbase for an old Bluesman these days.
Burnes’ Turns: Yes
Top 500 Consideration: No

464. “Kiss” – Prince (1986)
Even now, months since his passing, it’s hard to believe that Prince is gone. I’ll miss reading about his 4-hour sets in Rolling Stone and seeing pictures of him dramatically playing his collection of colorful guitars. Due to his continued activity leading up to his passing, his departure creates a larger void to me than other high profile deaths like David Bowie, who I actually consider to be a better overall artist. Even so, I was never a big fan of this one. Even if his music was on Spotify, I don’t think I’d consider it for my playlist.
Burnes’ Turns: No
Top 500 Consideration: No

463. “Soul Man” – Sam and Dave (1967)
It’s impossible for me to hear this song and not picture that famous scene in the old Nickelodeon show Drake and Josh. It’s a great jam, reinforced by nostalgia, but even though Brett absolutely loved it, I can’t say that I’ll be considering it for my Top 500. I guess I’ve just heard it enough.
Burnes’ Turns: No
Top 500 Consideration: No

462. “All Apologies” – Nirvana (1993)
Due to their rather overrated (in my opinion) position in the hierarchy of American music, I’ve never been the biggest fan of Nirvana. Contrary to popular belief, I consider them to be a much stronger singles band than album band (there’s just a bit too much fluff on Nevermind for me to consider it a classic in the vein of those included in my Hall of Fame). That being said, though, there’s no denying that this track is the stuff of legend. Krist Novoselic’s famous bass riff kicking in before Grohl and Cobain was a hell of a way to introduce the song, and it all still holds up today.
Burnes’ Turns: Yes
Top 500 Consideration: Yes

461. “Sheena is a Punk Rocker” – Ramones (1977)
Though my brother loves The Ramones, I was always more of a Clash man, myself. But after hearing their performance from the German Musikladen recordings, which was released as an album last year, I became a believer. But even before that, I knew that “Sheena is a Punk Rocker” was my favorite of their short bursts of Surf-Punk. It’s just irresistible, even if it is a little too close to “Blitzkrieg Bop” and the rest of their music, really. But honestly, I’m not sure that “Shenna” doesn’t outdo all of them.
Burnes’ Turns: Yes
Top 500 Consideration: Yes

This wasn’t the awesome collection that the last 10 songs were, but I at least enjoyed all of them to one degree or another. Four of them are keepers for consideration into my own list, six remain in my playlist, but all are worth hearing at least once.

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